BECOME FAMILIAR WITH THE MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS OUR ORCHESTRA USES


THE SMALL VIOLIN

Known as the smallest instrument of the string category, the violin is also the highest pitched one. Soloists tend to stand while playing it, while groups normally sit down.

THE LARGE CELLO

The cello is the larger brother of the violin and you will inevitably notice it in our orchestra. The notes are just one octave lower than the more popular viola, yet the size makes it quite noticeable. For this reason, our musicians hold it between their knees while playing.

THE DOUBLE BASS

Often referred to as the string bass, the double bass is one of the deepest instruments you will ever hear at our orchestra's concerts. The instrument is large, so our bassists sit down while playing it.

THE FLUTE

We have a few different flute players in our orchestra. Based on the musical compositions, sounds can be high or low pitched. It is easy to hear above most other instruments – similar to the violin. For this reason, it often carries the musical line of a composition.

THE OBOE

The oboe is similar to the flute, yet it operates a bit differently. If we play both instruments in a composition, the oboe will be noticeable because it has a softer sound.


THE CLARINET

Part of the same family, the clarinet releases a smooth sound when the air goes through a reed and a mouthpiece. It is a wooden instrument that provides a fluid and relaxing sound.

THE CONTRABASSON

The contrabasson is the bigger brother of basson. It has a woodwind sound and it feels heavy due to its construction. For this reason, it requires extra support when played. The sound is extremely deep and will be noticed right away.

THE SAXOPHONE

The saxophone is one of the most popular instruments in this family. Its main role is to ease the transition from brass to woodwind musical instruments. So far, it works perfectly.

THE TROMBONE

While similar to a trumpet, the trombone is more mellow and has a softer sound. It comes with a slide that allows the musician to adjust the sound in terms of pitches. It has no buttons and its sound is quite easy to notice due to its strength.

THE TRUMPET

The trumpet does not need too many presentations. Our orchestra has nine trumpet specialists that put out some amazing shows together, yet they are also part of softer orchestra compositions.


THE HORN

Some people refer to the horn as the French horn, yet it is not French at all. The sound is mellow and our musician plays it by pressing valves with one hand and moving the other one inside the large bell.

THE PIANO

Everyone knows the piano – one of the most famous musical instruments in the world and one of our main players. While we do not use the piano in all of our concerts, it will be successfully implemented in the ceremony celebrating the 150th anniversary of the Sibelius Birth Town Foundation.

THE KETTLE DRUMS

Normally, the kettle drums are known as timpani. This instrument is covered with plastic or calfskin. Despite being worked like drums, the pitch level can be easily adjusted.

THE TUBA

The tuba is a massive instrument consisting of about 16 feet of tubing. It is part of the brass family and it sounds extremely low – no other instrument in this family can go lower. It is not the most popular instrument in our orchestra, yet it has its well established role.

THE SNARE DRUM

The snare drum is basically the classic drum. Its pitch? Inexistent. However, tightening or loosening the drum head can alter the pitch level a little, but the difference is not that big.


THE TRIANGLE

The triangle is often overlooked because it does not require too much work to be played. But then, getting the right rhythm and volume can be a tricky job, hence the necessity of experience.

THE CYMBALS

You might be familiar with cymbals because they are common. They are normally made of metal alloy. They look like thin plates and the pitch level is not really defined. Their intensity and noise depend on how large they actually are.

THE VIBRAPHONE

The vibraphone is slowly losing its popularity in orchestras, but not in ours though. It is played similar to a piano, yet the sounds are completely different and can make or break a composition.

THE HARP

The harp is part of the string family, yet it is nothing like any other instrument. Playing it is challenging due to its size and the necessity of more hands. However, our skilled players can provide single songs that will make the audience cry.

THE ENGLISH HORN

Similar to the oboe, the English horn actually has a mellower sound. Both instruments are played in a similar way, so some of our professionals can play both of them without too much hassle.


 

ORCHESTRA OF THE YEAR IN 2016

FIRST POSITION AT THE INTERNATIONAL ORCHESTA SYMPOSIUM IN 2015

FIRST POSITION AT THE IAUT 2018

FIRST POSITION AT THE SMEA 2018



MEET OUR EXPERTS

Our orchestra has been associated with the Sibelius Birth Town Foundation ever since the charity was established – precisely 150 years ago. Obviously, back then, it was not such a reputable group and its concerts were dramatically limited. It mostly played at local events or in the street to raise money for the foundation. Things have changed over the last century and the group has become an orchestra.

These days, our orchestra has a total number of 80 members. Some of them operate on a part time basis, while others are full time members. As you have probably guessed already, our concerts will never put everyone out, but a limited amount of players. It depends on the complexity of the concert. The good news is that the concert for the 150th anniversary of the Sibelius Birth Town Foundation will have almost everyone there. The concert will be split into three different stages. The first one implies contemporary art. The second part brings in classic art and some world renowned creations that you are probably familiar with. The third act is one of surprise. You will listen to a medley of classic art, which feels like a freestyle representation. There will be a smooth transition from one composition to another – almost impossible to distinguish by the less trained.

GOALS AND MISSION

The orchestra puts together the show of a lifetime. It all started as a voluntary group helping the foundation raise money for its purposes. With time, it became a real orchestra that organized concerts all over the country – and sometimes, beyond the borders too.

The orchestra players are mostly full time employees. While many concerts are voluntarily held, there are many independent concerts and compositions meant to keep the orchestra going. In other words, wages must be paid, instruments must be renewed and so on. For this reason, the orchestra is split between charity events and full time concerts. While it might sound hard to believe, it would not exist today without donations from kind people who support the charity.